Maxime Retailleau’s editorial for the new issue of Antidote

Article publié le 13 octobre 2021

Text by Maxime Retailleau taken from Antidote’s Karma Issue, Winter 2021-2022. Photo : Ferry van der Nat.

“Shantih shantih shantih”

This “Karma” issue steps back from a world marked by the often blind and obstinate quest for productivity and efficiency, a world that still pretends it can control everything so as not to call itself into question. Founded on false assurances, capitalist logic pursues its frantic race, while the myths it has engendered collapse a bit more each day, announcing a crisis of disembodied rationality spurred by growing awareness of the effects of climate change.
“We reap what we sow,” warned one of the main laws of karma several millennia ago. However, each period of great upheaval also heralds the dawn of a new era full of possibilities. The one to come, then, could abandon the obsessive pursuit of profitability to seek out instead fulfillment and harmony between humans, the Earth, and all the beings that inhabit it. This, at least, is what Corine Sombrun – who began learning shamanic practices after suddenly entering a trance during a ritual ceremony – dreams of. She considers this Dionysian mental state as a gateway to challenge egocentrism. An aspiration she shares with today’s Radical Faeries, members of a gay movement born in the late 1970s, which drew inspiration from paganism and camp to rebel against patriarchal values and encourage a more ethical relationship to the environment.
This issue also features singer Kali Uchis, actress Agathe Rousselle – the female lead in Titane, winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival – and model, actor, and dancer Alton Mason, who discuss their individual relationships to the notion of karma and explain how it drives them to surpass themselves every day. The iconic Béatrice Dalle, interviewed by Canadian director Bruce LaBruce, evokes her unique relationship to Christ, while writer Simon Johannin pens an exclusive short story about the spiritual awakening he experienced over the past few months.   
This theme has also inspired several designers, who deploy esoteric motifs and references in their collections like so many fragments shored against the ruins of a world under construction, to paraphrase the poet T. S. Eliot, whose modernist masterpiece, The Waste Land, finds new resonance today.
The attraction to spirituality is also at the heart of this issue’s photographer, Lee Wei Swee, who attempts to surface a form of collective excitement in each of his shoots by voluntarily abandoning his ego. A collaborative outlook recalling, in part, that of rapper Laylow, whose long and generative collaboration with director Osman Mercan has played a determining role in his exponential success. Virtuous circles that promise good karma?

Les plus lus

Comment le business des données personnelles menace nos libertés individuelles ?

Depuis quelques années, le business model des mastodontes du web s’articule autour de la collecte acharnée de données, revendues à prix d’or afin de dresser des profils de consommateur·rice·s toujours plus pointus. Ce juteux négoce, où les Gafam se taillent la part du lion, nourrit un capitalisme qui menace à la fois le droit individuel et les libertés collectives, mais pourrait bien être enrayé par l’avènement du web 3.0. Un idéal d’Internet décentralisé rêvé, entre autres, par les cypherpunks. Enquête.

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How does the personal data business threaten our individual freedoms?

For several years now, the business model for web behemoths has been based on the relentless collection of data, which is sold at a high price to create ever more precise consumer profiles. This lucrative business, which GAFAM have taken the lion’s share of, drives a kind of capitalism that threatens both individual rights and collective freedoms. But the advent of Web 3.0 could very well put an end to this, realizing the ideal of a decentralized Internet first envisioned by the cypherpunks. Antidote reports.

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Trouble dissociatif de l’identité : à quoi ressemble la vie des personnes possédant plusieurs personnalités ?

Découvert par certain·e·s sur les réseaux sociaux via des influenceur·se·s comme @we.are.olympe ou à l’écran, dans sa version fictive, à travers le film Split (2016), le trouble dissociatif de l’identité (TDI) fascine ou effraie. Mais pour ceux·celles qui vivent avec plusieurs « alters » dans un seul corps, il s’agit surtout d’un mécanisme psychique de protection qui fait suite à des traumatismes extrêmes, tels que des violences sexuelles répétées pendant l’enfance. Classifié par l’OMS, il toucherait près de 1 % de la population, à des degrés divers. Pourtant, au sein même de la communauté scientifique, le TDI peine à être reconnu. 

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Dissociative Identity Disorder: what is life like for people with multiple personalities?

Introduced to many on social media via influencers such as @we.are.olympe, or in a fictionalized form in the movie Split (2016), Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) can be both fascinating and frightening. But for those who live with several “alters” in one body, it is mainly a psychic protection mechanism that follows extreme traumas such as repeated sexual violence during childhood. Classified by the WHO, it affects nearly 1% of the population to varying degrees. However, even within the scientific community, DID is still not widely recognized.

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Maxime Retailleau’s editorial for the new issue of Antidote

« Who’s Who? »

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